How To Grow Green Onions





Simply cut 2-3 inches from the bottom of the scallions.


Next get a cute dish and fill with rocks, pepples or seaglass like I used.


Place your cut scallions in and water daily.

Sit back and watch your green onions grow!



My most memorable hikes can be classified as "Shortcuts that Backfired".

Edward Abbey
The Journey Home: Some Words in Defense of the American West




Don't fight with Nature - she usually wins!





Ardent environmentalist and activist Edward Abbey tells it like it is:

My loyalties will not be bound by national borders, or confined in time by one nation's history, or limited in the spirtual dimension by one language or culture. I pledge my allegiance to the damned human race, and my everlasting love to the green hills of Earth, and my intimations of glory to the singing stars, to the very end of space and time.




“If the life of natural things, millions of years old, does not seem sacred to us, then what can be sacred? Human vanity alone? Contempt for the natural world is contempt for life. The domination of nature leads to the domination of human nature. Anything becomes permissible. We return once more to the nightmare cultures of Hitler, Stalin, King Philip II, Montezuma, Caligula, Heliogabalus, Herod, the Pharaohs; Christ sacrificed himself in vain.” 

Beyond the Wall: Essays from the Outside




The more I dim my eyes over print and frazzle my brain over abstract ideas, the more I appreciate the delight of being basically an animal wrapped in a sensitive skin: sex, the resistance of rock, the taste and touch of snow, the feel of the sun, good wine
and a rare beefsteak and the company of friends around a fire with a guitar and lousy old cowboy songs. Despair: I'll never be a scholar, never be a decent good Christian. Just a hedonist, a pagan, a primitive romantic.







Iceland clouds (Eva Sturm)

I care not, Fortune, what you me deny;
You cannot rob me of free Nature's grace,
You cannot shut the windows of the sky,
Through which Aurora shows her brightening face;
You cannot bar my constant feet to trace
The woods and lawns, by living stream, at eve.

James Thomson
Castle of Indolence (1748), Canto II, Stanza 3



Goodbye, Summer.





Ever heard of a moonbow?



moonbow (also known as a lunar rainbowblack rainbowwhite rainbowlunar bow, or space rainbow) is a rainbow produced by light reflected off the surface of the moon (as opposed to direct sunlight) refracting off of moisture laden clouds in the atmosphere. 

AGRAVIC [adjective]


1. defying gravity; not subject to gravity.

2. of or relating to a theoretical condition of no gravitation.


Etymology: a- (Middle English prefix meaning ‘not’) +gravity (Latin gravis ‘heavy’).






Quiet haiku

When it is quiet
And there is no one to fight
Dancing lifts my soul


SamuraiFrog



Truth







Maya Angelou's letter to her younger self:

"Don’t let anybody raise you. You’ve been raised."


Norman Rockwell_1954_Girl-at-the-mirror




Dear Marguerite,

You’re itching to be on your own. You don’t want anybody telling you what time you have to be in at night or how to raise your baby. You’re going to leave your mother’s big comfortable house and she won’t stop you, because she knows you too well.

But listen to what she says:

When you walk out of my door, don’t let anybody raise you—you’ve been raised.

You know right from wrong.

In every relationship you make, you’ll have to show readiness to adjust and make adaptations.

Remember, you can always come home.


You will go home again when the world knocks you down—or when you fall down in full view of the world. But only for two or three weeks at a time. Your mother will pamper you and feed you your favorite meal of red beans and rice. You’ll make a practice of going home so she can liberate you again—one of the greatest gifts along with nurturing your courage, that she will give you.

Be courageous, but not foolhardy.

Walk proud as you are,
Maya


(Source: What I Know Now: Letters to My Younger Self)  via



Purpose - a Venn diagram






Rock on



Beavis & Butthead



Elegance is not standing out, but being remembered.

Giorgio Armani


Emanuel Ungaro


E.B. White’s Beautiful Letter to a Man Who Had Lost Faith in Humanity



Dear Mr. Nadeau:
As long as there is one upright man, as long as there is one compassionate woman, the contagion may spread and the scene is not desolate. Hope is the thing that is left to us, in a bad time. I shall get up Sunday morning and wind the clock, as a contribution to order and steadfastness.
Sailors have an expression about the weather: they say, the weather is a great bluffer. I guess the same is true of our human society — things can look dark, then a break shows in the clouds, and all is changed, sometimes rather suddenly. It is quite obvious that the human race has made a queer mess of life on this planet. But as a people we probably harbor seeds of goodness that have lain for a long time waiting to sprout when the conditions are right. Man’s curiosity, his relentlessness, his inventiveness, his ingenuity have led him into deep trouble. We can only hope that these same traits will enable him to claw his way out.
Hang on to your hat. Hang on to your hope. And wind the clock, for tomorrow is another day.
Sincerely,
E. B. White


found in Letters of Note: Correspondence Deserving of a Wider Audience
via BrainPickings


Good morning



Life is really simple, but we insist on making it complicated.





Wants






But what, exactly, is anxiety, that pervasive affliction the nature

of which remains as drowning yet as elusive as the substance of a shadow? In his 1844 treatise The Concept of Anxiety, Danish philosopher Søren Kierkegaard (1813–1855) explains anxiety as the dizzying effect of freedom, of paralyzing possibility, of the boundlessness of one’s own existence — a kind existential paradox of choice. He writes:
Anxiety is a qualification of dreaming spirit, and as such it has its place in psychology. Awake, the difference between myself and my other is posited; sleeping, it is suspended; dreaming, it is an intimated nothing. The actuality of the spirit constantly shows itself as a form that tempts its possibility but disappears as soon as it seeks to grasp for it, and it is a nothing that can only bring anxiety. More it cannot do as long as it merely shows itself. [Anxiety] is altogether different from fear and similar concepts that refer to something definite, whereas anxiety is freedom’s actuality as the possibility of possibility.
[…]
Anxiety may be compared with dizziness. He whose eye happens to look down the yawning abyss becomes dizzy. But what is the reason for this? It is just as much in his own eye as in the abyss, for suppose he had not looked down. Hence, anxiety is the dizziness of freedom, which emerges when the spirit wants to posit the synthesis and freedom looks down into its own possibility, laying hold of finiteness to support itself. Freedom succumbs to dizziness. Further than this, psychology cannot and will not go. In that very moment everything is changed, and freedom, when it again rises, sees that it is guilty. Between these two moments lies the leap, which no science has explained and which no science can explain. He who becomes guilty in anxiety becomes as ambiguously guilty as it is possible to become.
alejandra baci

Another way of looking at anxiety


Anxiety can just as well express itself by muteness as by a scream.
Søren Kierkegaard


Core to this premise is the conception of anxiety as a dual force that can be both destructive and generative, depending on how we approach it.  Like Anais Nin herself observed in her reflection of why emotional excess is necessary for writing, Kierkegaard argues that anxiety is essential for creativity. 



1950:
We can understand Kierkegaard’s ideas on the relation between guilt and anxiety only by emphasizing that he is always speaking of anxiety in its relation to creativity. Because it is possible to create — creating one’s self, willing to be one’s self, as well as creating in all the innumerable daily activities (and these are two phases of the same process) — one has anxiety. One would have no anxiety if there were no possibility whatever. Now creating, actualizing one’s possibilities, always involves negative as well as positive aspects. It always involves destroying the status quo, destroying old patterns within oneself, progressively destroying what one has clung to from childhood on, and creating new and original forms and ways of living. If one does not do this, one is refusing to grow, refusing to avail himself of his possibilities; one is shirking his responsibility to himself. Hence refusal to actualize one’s possibilities brings guilt toward one’s self. But creating also means destroying the status quo of one’s environment, breaking the old forms; it means producing something new and original in human relations as well as in cultural forms (e.g., the creativity of the artist). Thus every experience of creativity has its potentiality of aggression or denial toward other persons in one’s environment or established patterns within one’s self. To put the matter figuratively, in every experience of creativity something in the past is killed that something new in the present may be born. Hence, for Kierkegaard, guilt feeling is always a concomitant of anxiety: both are aspects of experiencing and actualizing possibility. The more creative the person, he held, the more anxiety and guilt are potentially present.

From the always thought-provoking site, Brain Pickings.


I love you the more in that I believe you had liked me for my own sake and for nothing else.

John Keats


Hand spooning


Deceit







We (American) Indians live in a world of symbols and images

where the spiritual and the commonplace are one. To us [symbols] are part of nature, part of ourselves, even little insects like ants and grasshoppers. We try to understand them not with the head but with the heart, and we need no more than a hint to give us meaning.

John Fire Lame Deer, (died 1976)
Miniconjou Lakota, Storyteller, rebel, medicine man

 Photograph of diatoms arranged on a microscope slide by W.M. Grant.


 Photograph of diatoms collected in Russia and arranged on a microscope slide in 1952 by A.L. Brigger.


Photograph of fossil diatoms collected in Pt. Reyes National Seashore in Marin County, California, and arranged on a microscope slide in 1968 by A.L. Brigger.




More diatom images in this blog.